Global views on China

As part of the Sinophone Borderlands – Interaction at the Edges project, a series of large-scale representative surveys of public opinion are conducted investigating global views of China. The first such survey was run in September 2020 in 13 European countries – Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Poland, UK, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Sweden, Latvia, Serbia, and Russia. The next survey is planned for 2021 in selected Asian countries.

Palacky University team:
Renáta Sedláková
Kristína Kironská
Sergei Ivanov
Alfred Gerstl

Partners:

Andrej Findor (Comenius University in Bratislava)
Jiří Čeněk (Mendel University in Brno)
Matej Šimalčík (Central European Institute of Asian Studies)
Tamás Matura (Central and Eastern European Center for Asian Studies and Corvinus University of Budapest)
Adrian Brona (Jagiellonian University)
Mario Esteban (Elcano Royal Institute)
Björn Jerdén (Swedish Institute of International Relations)
Tim Summers (Chatham House and Chinese University of Hong Kong)
Tim Rühlig (Swedish Institute of International Relations)
Marc Julienne (French Institute of International Relations)
Beatrice Gallelli (Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia)
Alessandro Albana (Università di Bologna)
Una Aleksandra Bērziņa-Čerenkova (Rīga Stradiņš University)
Jelena Gledic (University of Belgrade)
Peter Gries (University of Manchester)
Amy Liu (University of Texas at Austin)
Matej Hruška (Comenius University in Bratislava)
Ondrej Buchel (Comenius University in Bratislava)

WHAT DO GERMANS THINK OF CHINA?

Germans, by their own admission, don’t know that much about China, but their skepticism is high and rising. Beijing has failed to significantly profit from the alienation of the German population from Trump-led America - writes Tim Rühlig (Utrikespolitiska Institutet), one of the co-authors of our recent report on public opinion of China in Europe.

POLL: THE EU HAS SOLID COMMON GROUND WHEN IT COMES TO CHINA

A new poll encompassing 13 European countries finds remarkable consensus on China – mostly negative.
By Richard Q. Turcsányi

Read more in The Diplomat.