GUEST LECTURE

Lectures by Sergey Abashin

Ethnic Category in Historic Context: forgotten people and new nations

Date

24 January 2019, 10:00

Location

Krizkovskeho 14, room KC-1.07

Abstract

We are accustomed to calling Central Asian inhabitants Uzbeks, Kyrgyzs, Tajiks, Kazakhs, and Turkmens. However, a little over a hundred years ago, the ethnographic map looked quite different. At that time, Sarts, Kara-Kirghizs, and Kirghiz-Kaisaks comprised the majority of the population. What happened with the names of the peoples? Who gave them and who changed them? How and why did the changes occur with regard to the ethnic names that seem so usual and clear today? This talk will try to answer all these questions. We will see what actors and institutions were involved in developing the classification of Central Asian ethnic groups, and we will examine the arguments at the basis of such classifications. The talk is based on an analytical approach that regards the establishment of nations not as an outcome of a centuries-long “ethnic history” but rather as a result of academic and social debates, political struggles, and political choices made in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Migration from Central Asia to Russia

Date

24 January 2019, 10:00

Location

Krizkovskeho 14, room KC-1.07

Abstract

As recently as in the 1980s, most experts agreed that the population of Soviet Central Asia has low mobility and is strongly attached to their territory. However, this viewpoint was proven wrong several years later, when millions of Central Asian residents became labor migrants all over the world. The talk will concern migration to Russia from three countries of Central Asia – Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. We will consider the numbers of migrants and the structure of migration, the main stages and dynamics of this process, as well as the reasons and motivation for new mobility. Statistics will help illustrate the main trends of migration. In particular, we will examine the concept of transnationalism as a model to explain and describe Central Asian migration.

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